Join Us for a Birding Trip! The Birds We Protect Conserving Birds and the Environment for 36 Years The Birds We Protect

Help Us Learn About Dangers to Our Migrants with D-Bird

[b]A Map of Bird Deaths and Injuries Generated Through D-Bird[/b]A Map of Bird Deaths and Injuries Generated Through D-Bird

Fall Migration is well underway--and sadly many migrants will run into trouble while attempting to navigate our city's maze of cement and glass. This time of year we receive many calls about birds found injured or perished from building collisions. Learn about the dangers facing birds by visiting our Project Safe Flight page.

If you find an injured or dead bird, there are many ways to help. Our partner, the Wild Bird Fund, offers excellent advice on what to do if you find an injured bird. If you believe the bird needs professional care, contact the Wild Bird Fund at 646-306-2862 or view our list of Animal Hospitals and Rehabilitation Centers in New York City to find a place to take the bird.

Just as important, you can make a valuable contribution to Project Safe Flight and contribute to our understanding of bird collisions in New York City by using D-Bird, our crowd-sourced bird mortality data collection tool. You can easily log where and when you found an injured or dead bird by visiting on your smartphone or computer. The more we know about where and when birds are colliding, the more context and guidance we will have to provide better Project Safe Flight monitoring efforts. This work is a component of Project Safe Flight, part of our broader effort generously supported by the Leon Levy Foundation to make the City a safer place for birds.

Is Your Garage Feeling Empty?

[b]Director of Conservation and Science Susan Elbin and Our "Zodiac" Research Boat[/b]Director of Conservation and Science Susan Elbin and Our "Zodiac" Research Boat

Our research boat's longtime hibernation den has changed hands and we are seeking a winter home for our "Zodiac." If you would consider donating an empty or spare garage in the NYC region through March, please email Susan Elbin at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Top Banner Photo Credits: Great Egret Nesting Colony © NYC Audubon; Group of Birders © Kati Solomon; All Others © François Portmann.

Bottom Photo Credits: Tribute in Light 2016 © NYC Audubon; Kingsland Wildflowers Roof © NYC Audubon.

* This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License, available at

Tribute in Light 2016 Recap

The Tribute in Light memorial once again shone bright over Lower Manhattan on September 11, projecting two beams of light into the night sky to pay tribute to the lives lost on that day in 2001. Thank you to Michael Ahern Production Services, Inc. and the National September 11 Memorial and Museum for letting us turn the lights off three times for brief periods during the early morning hours, allowing birds "trapped" in the light beams to continue on their migration. Read Conservation Biologist Debra Kriensky's full recap of this year's monitoring efforts on our blog, Syrinx.

The New York Daily News produced a fantastic video about our efforts to save birds during the Tribute in Light Memorial. Be sure to check it out!

Last Chance This Fall To Visit Our New Green Roof in Greenpoint

Our newly installed Kingsland Wildflowers green roof will be available for viewing one final time this fall! Join us this Saturday, October 15, 11am-3pm, to take a walking tour of the green roof at 520 Kingsland Avenue. The event will also offer the chance for visitors to engage with our partner organizations working on green infrastructure and environmental sustainability programs in North Brooklyn. Click here for more information.

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Visit NYC Audubon's blog, Syrinx, to see current updates on our work.

Our Video

"The Faces of Audubon" is a three-minute story about volunteer Adriana Palmer,  her growing interest in birds, and her work on Project Safe Flight, featuring our director of citizen science, John Rowden.
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