Help a Bird in Trouble

Help a Bird in Trouble

As millions of birds migrate through and nest in New York City each year, it is sadly far too common to find an injured, sick, dead, or orphaned bird in our city. Learn about what to do if you find a bird in trouble in New York City using our helpful guides.
Stunned Chestnut-sided Warbler found by a Project Safe Flight volunteer. Photo: Sophie Butcher
Stunned Chestnut-sided Warbler found by a Project Safe Flight volunteer. Photo: Sophie Butcher
What to Do If You Find an Injured Bird
The most common reason for finding an injured adult bird is due to a collision with glass. Up to 230,000 birds collide with glass each year in New York City. Learn how to identify whether you have found an injured bird and how to help it recover safely using our injured bird guide. 
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dBird is optimized for mobile and can determine your location for reports via GPS
dBird is optimized for mobile and can determine your location for reports via GPS
Report Bird Collisions with dBird

In 2014 we added an important tool to Project Safe Flight: dBird.org. An online crowd-sourcing data collection tool, dBird provides a way for the public to enter records of dead and injured birds, contributing to our collisions research by providing context and guidance for more scientifically rigorous research efforts like Project Safe Flight monitoring. Beyond NYC, we’ve received dBird reports from 24 U.S. states as well as Canada, China, India, and Norway. 

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This nestling American Robin shows the patches of bare skin and sheathed “pin feathers” typical of birds this age. This bird is too young to leave the nest. Photo: Megan Jankowski
This nestling American Robin shows the patches of bare skin and sheathed “pin feathers” typical of birds this age. This bird is too young to leave the nest. Photo: Megan Jankowski
What to Do If You Find a Young Bird
While it can be distressing to find a young bird that seems to need your help, it is important to not inflict further harm despite good intentions. First determine whether the bird is a hatchling, nestling, or fledgling, and then follow the instructions in our guide. 
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A Mallard ducking with broken leg recovering after being treated at the Wild Bird Fund. Photo: The Wild Bird Fund
A Mallard ducking with broken leg recovering after being treated at the Wild Bird Fund. Photo: The Wild Bird Fund
NYC Region Animal Hospitals and Rehabilitation Centers
A number of quality rehabilitators and hospitals are available to care for wounded birds and other wildlife in New York City and surrounding areas. While all of the listed rehabilitators will receive birds, many will also care for other wildlife. Please read the specific restrictions and requirements of each site listed on this page carefully. 
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